Panorama, 2018

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Waterfall on the Upper Reaches, 2018

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Veil of the Soul, 2018

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Ground Water Mirror, 2017

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Burnout, 2017

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Looking out, looking in, 2017

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Left bank, middle reach, high expectations, 2017

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Sandclock, 2018

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Chainman, 2018

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Forest, 2018

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The End of Wordsworth Street, 2018

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Blue flavour, 2018

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Travel without moving, 2018

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Hatrick's window (Tongariro), 2018

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Waterfall on the Grid (Māngere), 2017

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Power lines, 2018

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Chain reaction, 2018

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Lonely as a Cloud, 2018

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View of the peak, 2018

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As far as the eye can reach, 2018

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Where the river begins to look like itself, 2018

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I didn't feel it till I saw it, 2017

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Ground Water Mirror installation view @ Two Rooms, Auckland 2018. Photo © Sam Hartnett 

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Ground Water Mirror installation view @ Two Rooms, Auckland 2018. Photo © Sam Hartnett 

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Ground Water Mirror installation view @ Two Rooms, Auckland 2018. Photo © Sam Hartnett
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Ground Water Mirror installation view @ Two Rooms, Auckland 2018. Photo © Sam Hartnett

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Ground Water Mirror installation view @ Two Rooms, Auckland 2018. Photo © Sam Hartnett

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The End of Wordsworth Street installation view @ Sarjeant Gallery, Whanganui, 2018. Photo © Michael McKeagg
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The End of Wordsworth Street installation view @ Sarjeant Gallery, Whanganui, 2018. Photo © Michael McKeagg

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The End of Wordsworth Street installation view @ Sarjeant Gallery, Whanganui, 2018. Photo © Michael McKeagg
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The End of Wordsworth Street installation view @ Sarjeant Gallery, Whanganui, 2018. Photo © Michael McKeagg

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The End of Wordsworth Street installation view @ Sarjeant Gallery, Whanganui, 2018. Photo © Michael McKeagg
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Catalogue - The End of Wordsworth Street, 2018

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Catalogue - The End of Wordsworth Street, 2018
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Ground Water Mirror 


Ground Water Mirror is about a relationship with land and particularly water that has changed since industrialisation. Reflecting on the western notion of human domination over water, and the feeling of alienation from it that followed a dependance on its subjugation, I explore our reasons for romanticising this concept we have of Nature.


The title is a slight mistranslation of Grundwasserspiegel – the german word for water table. Aside from water's obvious mirror-like qualities that resulted in my translation, there is an expectation that follows contemplation of water – for it to provide a solution to the questions or anxieties we project onto it.


However we choose to describe water, we inevitably return to ourselves and our own experiences with water, using descriptions for which water itself has no name. It's cold, it runs, it flows, it seeps, rises and falls.


Berlin's ground water mirror is never far beneath our feet, one can hear it flow through those pink or blue overhead pipes as it is pumped across the city from construction sites to waterways. They remind us why we long for that other kind of water, for Romantic nature. Why we rely on it, fetishise it – and if we are privileged enough – travel to find it.


As we gaze into the mirror it holds up for us, we too easily imagine that what we behold is Nature when in fact we see the reflection of our own unexamined longings and desires – William Cronon, The Trouble with Wilderness; or, Getting Back to the Wrong Nature, 1995


Conor Clarke, 2018


Two Rooms press release

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